Mathematics
Te Tari Pāngarau me te Tatauranga
Department of Mathematics & Statistics

Upcoming seminars in Mathematics

Research seminars
Seminars in Statistics
Modelling spatial-temporal processes with applications to hydrology and wildfires

Valerie Isham, NZMS 2018 Forder Lecturer

University College London

Date: Tuesday 24 April 2018
Time: 11:00 a.m.
Place: Room MA241, 2nd floor, Science III building

Mechanistic stochastic models aim to represent an underlying physical process (albeit in highly idealised form, and using stochastic components to reflect uncertainty) via analytically tractable models, in which interpretable parameters relate directly to physical phenomena. Such models can be used to gain understanding of the process dynamics and thereby to develop control strategies.

In this talk, I will review some stochastic point process-based models constructed in continuous time and continuous space using spatial-temporal examples from hydrology such as rainfall (where flood control is a particular application) and soil moisture. By working with continuous spaces, consistent properties can be obtained analytically at any spatial and temporal resolutions, as required for fitting and applications. I will start by covering basic model components and properties, and then go on to discuss model construction, fitting and validation, including ways to incorporate nonstationarity and climate change scenarios. I will also describe some thoughts about using similar models for wildfires.

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Modelling sea ice

Lettie Roach

Victoria University Wellington and NIWA

Date: Tuesday 1 May 2018
Time: 11:00 a.m.
Place: Room MA241, 2nd floor, Science III building

Sea ice plays an integral role in the global climate system, determining absorption of solar radiation and influencing atmospheric and oceanic circulation. In this talk, I will give a brief overview of current sea ice models and discuss how lack of representation of sea ice floes may contribute to a poor simulation of the marginal ice zone. We have recently developed a comprehensive model of the sea ice floe size distribution, and results will be presented that give insight into the relative importance of different small-scale processes to overall behaviour. Development of this model also motivated an observational study of sea ice growth processes, which had not previously been quantified in the field. We find the additional physics modelled with inclusion of sea ice floes impacts sea ice concentration and thickness. This opens up new opportunities to study the interaction of sea ice with the climate system.

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Joshua Ritchie

Department of Mathematics and Statistics

Date: Tuesday 8 May 2018
Time: 11:00 a.m.
Place: Room MA241, 2nd floor, Science III building

Title and abstract to follow

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Markus Antoni

Department of Mathematics and Statistics

Date: Tuesday 15 May 2018
Time: 11:00 a.m.
Place: Room MA241, 2nd floor, Science III building

Title and abstract to follow

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Boris Daszuta

Department of Mathematics and Statistics

Date: Tuesday 22 May 2018
Time: 11:00 a.m.
Place: Room MA241, 2nd floor, Science III building

Title and abstract to follow

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Dominic Searles

Department of Mathematics and Statistics

Date: Tuesday 29 May 2018
Time: 11:00 a.m.
Place: Room MA241, 2nd floor, Science III building

Title and abstract to follow

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